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Tuesday, December 4

  1. page Tom Robinson and the Scottsboro Boys edited ... Primary documents related to the case afford several avenues of comparison between the Scottsb…
    ...
    Primary documents related to the case afford several avenues of comparison between the Scottsboro trials and Tom Robinson's trial in To Kill a Mockingbird. This is in addition to the more obvious parallels of time (1930s), place (Alabama), and charges (rape of white women by African-American men). First, the threat of lynching is common to both cases. Second, there is a similarity between the novel's Atticus Finch and the real-life judge James E. Horton, both of whom acted in behalf of black men on trial in defiance of their communities' wishes at a time of high feeling. In several instances, the words of the Alabama judge remind the reader of Atticus Finch's address to the jury and his advice to his children. Third, the accusers in both instances were very poor, working-class women who had secrets that the charges of rape were intended to cover up. Therefore, the veracity or believability of the accusers in both cases became an issue.
    In order to keep straight the people and events in this complicated case, a brief list of the main characters and a brief chronology of main events follow.
    Parallels Betweenthe Scottsboro and Tom Robinson Trials
    || The Scottsboro Trials
    Took place in the 1930s
    Took place in northern Alabama
    Began with a charge of rape made by white women against African American men
    The poor white status of the accusers was a critical issue.
    A central figure was a heroic judge, a member of the Alabama Bar who overturned a guilty jury verdict against African American men.
    This judge went against public sentiment in trying to protect the rights of the African American defendants.
    The first juries failed to include any African Americans, a situation which causeed the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the guilty verdict.
    The jury ignored evidence, for example, that the women suffered no injuries.
    Attitudes about Southern women and poor whites complicated the trial.
    Tom Robinson's Trial
    Occurs in the 1930s
    Takes place in southern Alabama
    Begins with a charge of rape made by a white woman against an African American man
    The poor white status of Mayella is a critical issue.
    A central figure is Atticus, lawyer, legislator and member of the Alabama Bar, who defends an African American man.
    Atticus arouses anger in the communtiy in trying to defend Tom Robinson.
    The verdict is rendered by a jury of poor white residents of Old Sarum.
    The jury ignores evidence, for example, that Tom has a useless left arm.
    Attitudes about Southern women and poor whites complicate the trial of Tom Robinson.
    The Author and the Book
    Nelle Harper Lee, the author of To Kill a Mockingbird, had many childhood experiences which are similar to those of her narrator, Scout Finch.
    || Harper Lee's Childhood
    Grew up in 1930s - rural southern Alabama town
    Father - Amasa Lee - attorney who served in state legislature in Alabama
    Older brother and young neighbor (Truman Capote) are playmates
    Harper Lee - an avid reader
    Six years old when Scottsboro trials were meticulously covered in state and local newspapers
    Scout Finch's Childhood
    Grew up in 1930s - rural southern Alabama town
    Father - Atticus Finch - attorney who served in state legislature in Alabama
    Older brother and young neighbor (Dill) are playmates
    Scout reads before she enters school; reads Mobile Register newspaper in first grade
    Six years old when the trial of Tom Robinson takes place
    Visit **Preparation Activities** for expanded information on the "The Author and the Book."
    The Civil Rights Era - Setting the Historical Context for the Novel and the Film
    Lee wrote the novel during the beginning of the Civil Rights era (from about 1955 to 1958). Alabama was very much in the news at this time with the Montgomery bus boycott, Martin Luther King's rise to leadership, and Autherine Lucy's attempt to enter the University of Alabama graduate school.
    Harper Lee, who was well known on campus as editor of the politcially satirical student newspaper, graduated from the university and entered law school, leaving one semester short of receiving a law degree. Lee's book was published in 1960 - a time of tumultuous events and racial strife as the struggle in the Civil Rights movement grew violent and spread into cities across the nation, and into the American consciousness on TV screens and the nightly news.
    The novel shot to the top of the New York Times Best Seller list, as it began to make its remarkable impact on a divided nation. A year after its publication Lee worked as a consultant on the film adaptation of the novel and the screenplay written by Horton Foote. The film was released in 1962 and went on to receive five Academy Award nominations, winning three.
    Visit **A Chronology of the Civil Rights Movement** in the **Historical Archives**.
    "Historical Background." ThinkQuest : Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Dec. 2012. <http://library.thinkquest.org/12111/SG/SG5.html>.

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  2. page Work Cited edited Works Cited (History) "African-American History Timeline: A Chronology of Black History from…
    Works Cited (History)
    "African-American History Timeline: A Chronology of Black History from the Early Slave Trade through Affirmative Action." Infoplease. Infoplease, n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2012. <http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmtimeline.html>.
    Block, Herbert. ""Tote Dat Barge! Lift Dat Boycott! Ride Dat Bus!"" Editorial. "Tote Dat Barge! Lift Dat Boycott! Ride Dat Bus!" Library of Congress, 25 Mar. 1956. Web. 03 Dec. 2012. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/00652205/>.
    Brunner, Borguna. "African-American History Timeline A Chronology of Black History from the Early Slave Trade through Affirmative Action." Infoplease. Infoplease, n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2012. <http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmtimeline.html>.
    Johnson, Claudia D. "Historical Context: The Scottsboro Trials." ThinkQuest. Oracle Foundation, 1994. Web. 01 Dec. 2012. <http://library.thinkquest.org/12111/scottsboro/historic.htm>.
    Mauldin, Bill. "[Civil Rights]." [Civil Rights]. Library of Congress, 12 Feb. 1964. Web. 03 Dec. 2012. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/acd1999001157/PP/>.
    Mauldin, Bill. "Independence Day - 1964." Independence Day - 1964. Library of Congress, 5 July 1964. Web. 03 Dec. 2012. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/acd1999001206/PP/>.
    Mergen, Anne. "An Apple for the Teacher." 18 May 1954: n. pag. An Apple for the Teacher. Library of Congress. Web. 03 Dec. 2012. <http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2008678888/>.
    Ross, Leon T., and Kenneth A. Mimms. African American Almanac: Day-by-day Black History. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1997. Print.
    Woloch, Nancy. "Chapter 12: Section 1 and 2." The Americans. By Gerald A. Danzer, Larry S. Krieger, J. Jorge, Klor De Alva, and Louis E. Wilson. Evanston, Illinois, Boston, Dallas: McDougal Little, 2003. 379-87. Print.
    Works Cited (English):
    Lee, Harper. To Kill A Mockingbird. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 20061960. Print.
    Mulligan, Robert. “All Men Are Created Equal- To Kill A Mockingbird (6/10) Movie CLIP”. 16 June 2011. Online video clip. YouTube. Accessed 2 December 2012.
    ksimpson1995. "SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird." SparkNotes: Today's Most Popular Study Guides. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Dec. 2012. <http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/mocking/>.
    Shields, Charles J.. Mockingbird: A Portrait of Harper Lee. New York: Henry Holt, 2007. Print.
    "Historical Background." ThinkQuest : Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Dec. 2012. <http://library.thinkquest.org/12111/SG/SG5.html>.

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  3. page Grading for this Unit edited Evaluation and Grading Policies: Attendance (5%) Rationale: It is crucial that in order for a st…
    Evaluation and Grading Policies:
    Attendance (5%)
    Rationale: It is crucial that in order for a student to learn and educate themselves, they must always be to class on time and prepared.

    Class Participation (15%)
    Rationale: Students are expected to provide insightful, relevant, and informed contributions to class discussions. This will also prove they have done the assigned homework.
    ...
    Homework (15%)
    Rationale: It is essential that students stay with the class in reading. If students do not do their homework they will fall behind.
    ...
    Home Test (15%)(20%) – Due:
    Rationale: This is slightly more challenging than the homework assignments. It is to stimulate the student’s thoughts and challenge their knowledge on the novel.
    Essay (40%) – Due: Friday, December 14, 2012
    ...
    been returned.

    -Mr. B and Ms. D

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  4. page Grading for this Unit edited ... Rationale: It is crucial that in order for a student to learn and educate themselves, they mus…
    ...
    Rationale: It is crucial that in order for a student to learn and educate themselves, they must always be to class on time and prepared.
    Class Participation (15%)
    StudentsRationale: Students are expected
    ...

    Group Work: (15%)
    Working
    (10%)
    Rationale: Working
    with others
    ...
    topics.
    Homework (20%)
    It
    (15%)
    Rationale: It
    is essential
    ...
    fall behind.
    Take Home Test (15%) – Due: Monday, December 10, 2012
    Rationale: This is slightly more challenging than the homework assignments. It is to stimulate the student’s thoughts and challenge their knowledge on the novel.

    Essay (45%)
    In
    (40%) – Due: Friday, December 14, 2012
    Rationale: In
    order for
    ...
    will be accepted.accepted but due one week after the papers have been returned.
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  5. page Homework edited ... What is the official ruling of death of Scout and Jem’s attacker? How is the damage to Jem? …
    ...
    What is the official ruling of death of Scout and Jem’s attacker?
    How is the damage to Jem?
    Due December 10: Mr. B's take-home test. This was distributed on December 6, 2012.
    For history, I will be assigning readings of sections from the textbook. I will not assign you questions to these sections but I do expect you do the reading. Some events we do not discuss in class and lecture, so it is crucial that you read about these events for better understanding and further knowledge.
    Thanks,
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  6. page Assignment edited ... Due December 14, 2012 (one week from the last lesson of this unit) Directions: Choose one of …
    ...
    Due December 14, 2012 (one week from the last lesson of this unit)
    Directions: Choose one of the following essays. This 3-4 page essay must be typed, double-spaced, 1" margins, include a header on top-right corner (last name, page number), Works Cited (not included in the 3-4 pages), make sure to include which question you are responding to. Mr. B and Ms. D will divide the papers evenly to grade. Create a clear and well thought out response to the question. If you have any questions set up a meeting with either of us to discuss the paper.
    ...
    specific examples (NOT Scottsboro Boys and Tom Robinson's Trials) in the
    2. Discuss Scout as a narrator. Is she a reliable narrator? Does she mature over the course of events in the novel? Can she be considered a voice of reason? How does her family, specifically Atticus and Jem, influence her opinions and behavior of society? Give specific examples of how Scout’s 10 year old perception of events are naïve and innocent.
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  7. page Assignment edited Due: Due December 10, 2012: Mr. B's take home test! Due December 14, Directions: Choose one of…
    Due:Due December 10, 2012: Mr. B's take home test!
    Due
    December 14,
    Directions: Choose one of the following essays. This 3-4 page essay must be typed, double-spaced, 1" margins, include a header on top-right corner (last name, page number), Works Cited (not included in the 3-4 pages), make sure to include which question you are responding to. Mr. B and Ms. D will divide the papers evenly to grade. Create a clear and well thought out response to the question. If you have any questions set up a meeting with either of us to discuss the paper.
    ...
    Rights Era? Keep in mind the novel is placed in 1935 in Alabama. Give specific
    2. Discuss Scout as a narrator. Is she a reliable narrator? Does she mature over the course of events in the novel? Can she be considered a voice of reason? How does her family, specifically Atticus and Jem, influence her opinions and behavior of society? Give specific examples of how Scout’s 10 year old perception of events are naïve and innocent.
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  8. page African-American History edited ... The history of African-Americans in the United States extremely important and influential to t…
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    The history of African-Americans in the United States extremely important and influential to the way America is shaped today. African-American’s have a very sad and heart-wrenching history that almost no other culture has endured. The transformation from such an oppressed society in slavery to the accomplishment of political activists and social reforms has made African-American history so unique and incredible.
    To coincide with Mr. B’s lessons on Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird, we will separate our history lessons in to two sections. The first lesson will be Pre-1930s, which is the time before Harper Lee’s birth. The second lesson covers Post-1930s, the time of the Civil Rights Movements in America and the events that were happening in Harper Lee’s society.
    ...
    Rights Movements.
    Remember to follow the readings from our homework in order for you to understand what we discuss in class completely. The readings are from our The Americas textbook.

    This is such an incredibly important part of not only American society, but also human society as a whole. It is important to understand this history and how it affected Harper Lee. Keep in mind the events we discuss while you go over the literature lessons with Mr. B.
    If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to email me at jduignan@friars.providence.edu
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